Programming the Latent: A Post Colonial View on Kam Raslan’s ‘Confessions of an Old Boy’

By Ahmad Thamrini Fadzlin Syed Mohamed.

Published by The Social Sciences Collection

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Article: Print $US10.00
Article: Electronic $US5.00

Through Kam Raslan’s Confessions of an Old Boy: The Dato’ Hamid Adventures, this paper discusses the sustaining colonial ideology as an effect of the English Public School system in the Malay College Kuala Kangsar. Representing the effect of colonial education taking place in a prominent education institution in Malaysia, the novel successfully projects the latent form of colonisation in the mind of Dato’ Hamid, an Old Boy from MCKK. Only this time, the relationship depicted in the novel would no longer be between the coloniser and the colonised, but rather between the old boys of MCKK and the others. In evaluating the effect of the English Public School system implemented in MCKK from post-colonial view, this paper compared three ideas of Edward Said’s Orientalism, which are Knowledge and Power, Eurocentrism, and Othering. Through literature and evidence found in the novel, this paper proposed that the colonial ideology sustained its survival through the culture programming process.

Keywords: Postcolonial, Orientalism, Latent Colonisation, Colonial Education

International Journal of Interdisciplinary Social Sciences, Volume 5, Issue 1, pp.75-90. Article: Print (Spiral Bound). Article: Electronic (PDF File; 1.236MB).

Ahmad Thamrini Fadzlin Syed Mohamed

Language Teacher, Centre for Language and Liberal Studies, National Defense University Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur, Wilayah Persekutuan, Malaysia

I graduated from Universiti Teknologi MARA Malaysia with a bachelor degree in education for teaching English as a second language. Teaching various English subjects for the National Defence University Malaysia, I am currently pursuing my Masters degree in Postcolonial Literature in English at National University Malaysia.

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