Interdisciplinary Models of Teamwork in Augmentative and Alternative Communication

By Manon Robillard, Roxanne Bélanger, Nicole Keating, Chantal Mayer-Crittenden and Michèle Minor-Corriveau.

Published by The International Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies in Communication

Format Price
Article: Print $US10.00
Article: Electronic $US5.00

Augmentative and alternative communication is a specialization in speech-language pathology that aims to help people with complex communication needs. Gestures, signs, pointing to symbols or technology are examples of methods that can be used to facilitate the communication of thoughts and needs. Clients seeking an augmentative and alternative communication assessment must be evaluated by a team of professionals, which includes a speech-language pathologist and an occupational therapist. Members of the team need to work closely together, within what is considered to be a transdisciplinary model. The speech-language pathologist and occupational therapist work closely with other professionals in order to help people needing augmentative and alternative communication. These other professionals can include: technicians, communicative disorders assistants, physical therapists, physicians, psychologists and teachers. A conceptual model encompassing multidisciplinary, interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary practice has been proposed for the assessment and intervention of people who have complex communication needs.

Keywords: Augmentative and Alternative Communication, Interdisciplinarity, Speech-language Pathology

The International Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies in Communication, Volume 7, Issue 1, pp.35-44. Article: Print (Spiral Bound). Article: Electronic (PDF File; 184.674KB).

Dr. Manon Robillard

Assistant Professor, Speech and Language Pathology Programs, Department of French Studies, Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada

Manon Robillard has been specializing in augmentative and alternative communication since obtaining her master’s degree in speech language pathology from Laurentian University in 1999. She is presently a professor for the speech language pathology programs at Laurentian University. Since January 2010, Manon is also pursuing doctoral studies in the interdisciplinary Human Studies program at Laurentian University. Her current research focuses on the use of speech generating devices by young children with complex communication needs. Manon is primarily interested in the vocabulary needs of French speaking and bilingual children who are integrated into kindergarten classrooms, a topic which she has had the opportunity of presenting at the international level. She is also studying the role that visual spatial memory plays in the navigation process required when searching for vocabulary within speech generating devices.

Dr. Roxanne Bélanger

Associate Professor, Department of French Studies, Bachelor's Program in Health Sciences - Baccalauréat ès sciences de la santé (orthophonie), Laurentian University - Université Laurentienne, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada

Roxanne received her Master’s Degree in Speech-Language Pathology in 2002 from Ottawa University. Since this time, she is a registered member of the College of Audiologists and Speech-Language Pathologist of Ontario (CASLPO). Roxanne presently works with preschool and school aged children at the Children’s Treatment Centre at Health Sciences North. Since 2009, she lectures at Laurentian University as an Associate Professor in the Baccalauréat ès sciences de la santé (orthophonie), a new undergraduate program aimed at studying speech and language sciences. She is currently pursuing her doctoral studies in the Human Studies at Laurentian University, a program with a strong interdisciplinary orientation.

Nicole Keating

-, -, Canada

Dr. Chantal Mayer-Crittenden

Assistant Professor, Speech and Language Pathology Programs, Department of French Studies, Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada

Chantal Mayer-Crittenden is a Speech and Language Pathologist and associate professor in the Speech and Language Pathology Program at Laurentian University, Sudbury, Canada. She has a special interest in primary language impairment (PLI), interdisciplinary research and bilingualism. As a PhD student in the Interdisciplinary Human Studies program at Laurentian University, she is currently working on her doctoral thesis entitled: "Second Language Learning for Majority-Language children in a Minority Context: Language Impairment or typical second language development?". This thesis will examine the linguistic and cognitive abilities of bilingual children with a PLI. She has presented at the international level on this topic. Further, she is also working on a minor component related to interdisciplinary studies in the field of communication sciences and disorders.

Dr. Michèle Minor-Corriveau

Associate Professor, Department of French Studies (Département d'études françaises), Bachelor’s Programme in Health Sciences (Speech-Language Pathology) - Baccalauréat ès sciences de la santé (orthophonie), Laurentian University – Université Laurentienne, Azilda, Ontario, Canada

Michèle received her Master's Degree in Speech-Language Pathology in 1998 from Laurentian University. She is a registered member of the College of Audiologists and Speech-Language Pathologists of Ontario (CASLPO). Since 1998, she has worked with school-aged children presenting with speech and language difficulties and disorders. In May of 2012, she successfully defended her doctoral thesis in Human Studies, an interdisciplinary doctoral programme focusing on integrating professionals from various background around a common complex problem. Her research interests center around, but are not limited to, creating standardized procedures for assessment and intervention of speech and language disorders targeting linguistic minorities, namely, the franco-ontarian population. Since 2008, Michèle has been providing lectures and teaches courses as an Associate Professor at Laurentian University, in the Health Sciences undergraduate and graduate programmes in Speech Language Pathology. She is a strong advocate for francophones and francophiles alike, and is always honoured to help promote the profession of Speech-Language Pathology and its relevance in the bilingual setting.