An Interdisciplinary Framework for Speech-Language Pathologists: A Closer Look at Bilingual Language Development and Its Disorders

By Chantal Mayer-Crittenden, Michèle Minor-Corriveau, Manon Robillard, Roxanne Bélanger and Nicole Keating.

Published by The International Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies in Communication

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Speech-Language Pathologists examine language not only in its organization of complex linguistic structures, but also in terms of the processes on which it is partially dependent. Consequently, the object of research in speech-language pathology is language, together with human communication and human cognition as well as the social interactions that come into play. When studying language pathologies, we must be able to identify where the difficulties lie. It is not only the linguistic components that must be considered, but also the neurological, anatomical, physiological, cognitive, social and pragmatic aspects that are intrinsically associated. This paper defines interdisciplinarity within the field of speech-language pathology, more specifically, the study of bilingualism and the development of linguistic competencies, using an epistemological and praxeological standpoint. A theoretical framework which includes theories on emergentism, bioecological systems and dynamic systems is proposed in order to assess and treat monolingual and bilingual children with and without language impairments using a holistic and interdisciplinary approach.

Keywords: Speech-Language Pathology, Interdisciplinarity, Language Impairment

The International Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies in Communication, Volume 7, Issue 3, pp.75-89. Article: Print (Spiral Bound). Article: Electronic (PDF File; 607.772KB).

Dr. Chantal Mayer-Crittenden

Assistant Professor, Speech and Language Pathology Programs, Department of French Studies, Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada

Chantal Mayer-Crittenden is a speech-language pathologist and assistant professor in the Speech-language Pathology program at Laurentian University, Ontario, Canada. She has a special interest in primary language impairment (PLI), interdisciplinary research and bilingualism. She recently completed her PhD in the interdisciplinary Human Studies program at Laurentian University with a focus on the linguistic and cognitive abilities of bilingual children with a PLI. She has presented at the international level on this topic.

Dr. Michèle Minor-Corriveau

Assistant Professor, Speech and Language Pathology Programs, Department of French Studies, Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada

Michèle Minor-Corriveau is currently an assistant professor in the Speech-language Pathology program at Laurentian University in Ontario, Canada. She is also a speech-language pathologist with 15 years of clinical experience working with school-aged children. Michèle obtained her PhD in the interdisciplinary doctorate of Human Studies at Laurentian University. She has gained various lecturing experiences speaking about test standardization and validation as it pertains to linguistic minority settings both locally and internationally.

Dr. Manon Robillard

Assistant Professor, Speech and Language Pathology Programs, Department of French Studies, Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada

Manon Robillard is currently an assistant professor for the Speech-language Pathology program at Laurentian University in Ontario, Canada. She is also a speech-language pathologist with 14 years of clinical experience in augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). Manon recently obtained her PhD in the interdisciplinary Human Studies program at Laurentian University. She has gained various speaking experiences in AAC, including international conferences.

Dr. Roxanne Bélanger

Associate Professor, Department of French Studies, Bachelor's Program in Health Sciences - Baccalauréat ès sciences de la santé (orthophonie), Laurentian University - Université Laurentienne, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada

Roxanne Bélanger is an assistant professor in the B.H.Sc. and M.H.Sc. in Speech-language Pathology at Laurentian University, Ontario, Canada. She is a practicing speech-language pathologist with clinical experience in neonatology, pediatric and geriatric settings. She graduated as an SLP in 2002 at Ottawa University and has recently obtained her PhD in the interdisciplinary Human Studies program at Laurentian University on the neurodevelopmental outcomes of children born prematurely.

Nicole Keating

Speech and Language Pathologist, PhD student, Laurentian University, Sudbury

Nicole Keating is a speech-language pathologist for the Sudbury Catholic District School Board. She is presently pursuing doctoral studies in the interdisciplinary Human Studies program at Laurentian University in Ontario, Canada, where she is also a sessional professor for the Speech-language Pathology program.