Speech-Language Pathology: A Look at What Makes this Field Interdisciplinary by Nature

By Michèle Minor-Corriveau, Manon Robillard, Roxanne Bélanger, Nicole Keating and Chantal Mayer-Crittenden.

Published by The International Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies in Communication

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Speech-language pathology is an interdisciplinary field which began its development in the early XVIIIth century. Modern speech-language pathology, for its part, has arisen in postmodernity and is based on discoveries in classical sciences. The constructs of sciences, whether new, redefined or reinvented, are produced in and by a scientific community that agrees on the definitions, presuppositions and objectives of the knowledge being constructed (Fourez 1998). For this reason, interdisciplinarity can only be defined by enhancing the precision of terms that are still sufficiently vague to be considered as synonymous by some researchers and theorists. A clear understanding of this terminology requires a literature review and leads to the use of a common vocabulary that aims to increase the transparency and accessibility of concepts and models that stem from the precisions provided to these definitions. Over time, concepts evolve, are refined, are defined more precisely and they eventually circumscribe a previously unexplored reality. To frame speech-language pathology in an interdisciplinary perspective, a review of the literature was conducted to define terms that are sometimes used in parallel, at times positioned in a hierarchy or used interchangeably.”

Keywords: Interdisciplinarity, Transdisciplinarity, Multidisciplinarity, Pluridisciplinarity, Disciplinarity, Speech-Language Pathology, Speech, Language, Speech-Language Pathologist

The International Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies in Communication, Volume 7, Issue 2, pp.1-13. Article: Print (Spiral Bound). Article: Electronic (PDF File; 483.522KB).

Dr. Michèle Minor-Corriveau

Assistant Professor, Speech and Language Pathology Programs, Department of French Studies, Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada

Michèle Minor-Corriveau is an assistant professor in the Speech-Language Pathology program at Laurentian University in Ontario, Canada. She is also a Speech-Language Pathologist with 15 years of clinical experience working with school-aged children. Michèle obtained her PhD in the interdisciplinary doctorate of Human Studies at Laurentian University where her research centered around standardizing and validating a speech and language screening tool aimed at early detection of speech and language difficulties in franco-ontarien children upon school entry. She has gained various lecturing experiences speaking about test standardization and validation as it pertains to linguistic minority settings both locally and internationally.

Dr. Manon Robillard

Assistant Professor, Speech and Language Pathology Programs, Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada

Manon Robillard is currently an assistant professor for the Speech-language Pathology program at Laurentian University in Ontario, Canada. She is also a speech-language pathologist with 14 years of clinical experience in augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). Manon is a doctoral candidate in the interdisciplinary Human Studies program at Laurentian University. She has gained various speaking experiences in AAC, including international conferences.

Dr. Roxanne Bélanger

Associate Professor, Department of French Studies, Bachelor's Program in Health Sciences - Baccalauréat ès sciences de la santé (orthophonie), Laurentian University - Université Laurentienne, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada

Roxanne Belanger is an assistant professor in the B.Sc.S. and M.Sc.S. in Speech-language Pathology at Laurentian University, Ontario, Canada. She is a practicing speech-language pathologist with clinical experience in neonatology, pediatric and geriatric settings. She graduated as an SLP in 2002 at Ottawa University and is currently pursuing her doctoral studies at Laurentian University, studying neurodevelopmental outcomes of children born prematurely.

Nicole Keating

Laurentian University, -, Ontario, Canada

Nicole Keating is a Speech-Language Pathologist employed by the Sudbury Catholic District School Board. She is presently pursuing doctoral studies in the interdisciplinary Human Studies program at Laurentian University in Ontario, Canada, where she is also a sessional professor for the Speech-language Pathology program.

Dr. Chantal Mayer-Crittenden

Assistant Professor, Speech and Language Pathology Programs, Department of French Studies, Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada

Chantal Mayer-Crittenden is a Speech-Language Pathologist and assistant professor in the Speech-language Pathology program at Laurentian University, Ontario, Canada. She has a special interest in primary language impairment (PLI), interdisciplinary research and bilingualism. As a PhD student in the interdisciplinary Human Studies program at Laurentian University, she is currently working on her doctoral thesis. She is examining the linguistic and cognitive abilities of bilingual children with a PLI. She has presented at the international level on this topic. Further, she is also working on a minor component related to interdisciplinary studies in the field of communication sciences and disorders.