Adolescents’ Self-concept and Social Status in School Class

By Jeļena Ļevina, Natalija Ivanova and Oksana Jenenkova.

Published by The International Journal of Interdisciplinary Educational Studies

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The purpose of this research was to investigate the relations between multidimensional self-concept of adolescents and different dimensions of social status in school class (social preference, social impact, perceived popularity and social dominance). The sample consisted of 297 participants from Latvian schools aged from 14 to 17 years (boys: 49.5%, girls: 50.5%). Participants completed the Russian version of the Self-Description Questionnaire-II (SDQ-II) developed by J. Ļevina and N. Ivanova (2011). The original English version of the SDQ-II was designed by H. Marsh (1990) and measures 11 different dimensions of self-concept. Three procedures were used to determine students’ social status: sociometric procedure (Coie, Dodge, & Coppotelli, 1982), peers’ nomination procedure (Parkhurst & Hopmeyer, 1998), and paired-comparison procedure (Lease, Musgrove, & Axelrod, 2002). A correlational analysis was conducted in order to investigate relations between dimensions of adolescents’ social status in school class and multiple aspects of their self-concept. In order to investigate the contribution of dimensions of social status on multiple aspects of self-concept a series of regression analyses was conducted. Results indicated that there was a positive relationship between physical abilities self-concept and social preference, perceived popularity, and social dominance; physical appearance self-concept and perceived popularity and social dominance; opposite-sex peer relations self-concept and perceived popularity and social dominance; same-sex peer relations self-concept and social preference, perceived popularity, and social dominance; math self-concept and perceived popularity; general school self-concept and social impact, perceived popularity, and social dominance; general self-concept and social dominance. It was found that social dominance significantly and best predicted physical abilities self-concept, physical appearance self-concept, same-sex relations self-concept, general school self-concept, and general self. Perceived popularity and social dominance both contributed significantly to levels of opposite-sex relations self-concept. Perceived popularity significantly predicted math self-concept.

Keywords: Self-concept, Social Status, Social Preference, Social Impact, Perceived Popularity, Social Dominance

The International Journal of Interdisciplinary Educational Studies, Volume 7, Issue 1, pp.21-40. Article: Print (Spiral Bound). Article: Electronic (PDF File; 459.894KB).

Dr. Jeļena Ļevina

PhD Student, Psychology and Art, Faculty of Education, University of Latvia, Riga, Latvia

Jeļena Ļevina’s Education background includes: International Institute of Practical Psychology (Psychology Bachelor’s Degree and Practical Psychologists Qualification); University of Latvia (Social Science Master’s Degree in Psychology); Continuing education courses: The Education, Youth and Sports Department of the Riga Council, “Supervision of professional activities of educational psychologist, on the ground of basic principles of existential psychotherapy”. Jeļena Ļevina’s previous work experience includes: International Higher School of Practical Psychology, Faculty of Psychology, docent; Riga Secondary School No 96, school psychologist. Ļevina’s scientific interests are developmental and social psychology. Ļevina’s fields of research include self-concept, social status, social networks,and social representations. Ļevina has participated in scientific projects financed by ESF.

Dr. Natalija Ivanova

Docent, Faculty of Psychology, International Higher School of Practical Psychology, Riga, Latvia

Dr. Natalija Ivanova’s educational background includes: Kostroma Pedagogy Institute, Faculty of History and Pedagogy; Moscow State University, Faculty of psychology, psychologist in educational system; Moscow State University, post-graduate; Institute of humanistic and existencial psychology (Lithuania), existencial psychotherapist; Institute of humanistic and existencial psychology (Lithuania), superviser program, superviser of existential psychotherapy. Dr. Ivanova’s work experience includes: International Higher School of practical psychology, docent; Latvian Practical psychologists association and Latvian School psychologists association, superviser; Institute of humanistic and existencial psychology, superviser and psychotherapist. Dr. Ivanova’s scientific interests include developmental psychology, existential psychotherapy. Dr. Ivanova’s has participated in scientific projects financed by ESF.

Oksana Jenenkova

PhD Student, Social Psychology Department, Faculty of Social Sciences, Daugavpils University, Riga, Latvia

Oksana Jenenkova’s educational background includes: Latvian Aviation University (Faculty of Economics in specialty “Economics and work psychology”); SPPI; Latvian transologic psychotherapy and sexologists and sexual pathologists association; Daugavpils University (Master’s degree of Social Sciences in Psychology). Jenenkova’s main activities and responsibilities include: socially psychological research, psychological consultation, development of training courses, and socially psychological trainings. Jenenkova’s scientific interests include social cognition, interpersonal relations, social networks, and social representations. Jenenkova’s fields of research are road traffic safety, behaviours of driver; social and psychological, and social and economic problems in society; working conditions, social networks, etc. Jenenkova has participated in scientific projects financed by Latvian Aviation University, ESF, etc.