Is There Any Correlation between Place-making and Place Attachment? A Challenge for Interdisciplinary Research

By Nancy Marshall and Kate Bishop.

Published by The International Journal of Interdisciplinary Social and Community Studies

Format Price
Article: Print $US10.00
Article: Electronic $US5.00

For the first time in history, the majority of the world's population lives in cities which are pluralistic in nature. As urban densities and cultural complexities increase, the public spaces in cities become ever more important. Local governments are increasingly interested in how to improve community wellbeing and the liveability of their cities. Placemaking initiatives as “deliberate attention to and investment in the human, experiential quality of a place” (Grant 2013, 11) are in part an intervention attempting to create positive relationships between people and place. Contemporary approaches to placemaking absorb millions of dollars in community and government resources each year in attempts to make better urban places. The theory from several disciplines supports the notion that ‘place attachment’ (the process of people-place bonding whereby a place has the capacity to affect emotional response) is a significant component of community, identity, health and wellbeing. This paper explores the possible connections between the practice of placemaking in cities and place attachment. It identifies the need for further interdisciplinary research examining these connections to ensure the creation of socially successful cities and to substantiate the practice and costs of placemaking.

Keywords: Placemaking, Cities, Place Attachment

The International Journal of Interdisciplinary Social and Community Studies, Volume 9, Issue 3-4, April 2015, pp.1-10. Article: Print (Spiral Bound). Article: Electronic (PDF File; 358.304KB).

Dr. Nancy Marshall

Associate Dean of Education, Faculty of the Built Environment, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

Dr. Kate Bishop

Senior Lecturer, Faculty of the Built Environment, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia