Exploring the Strategic Prevention Framework (SPF) and its Application to a Comprehensive Substance Abuse and HIV/AIDS Prevention Initiative: Evidence from Project C.O.P.E. (Communities Organizing for Prevention and Empowerment): A Model Substance Abuse and HIV/AIDS Prevention Initiative Targeting Urban Minority Youth in the Northeastern United States

By Robert J. Reid and Pauline Garcia-Reid.

Published by The International Journal of Interdisciplinary Social and Community Studies

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The inextricable link between substance abuse and HIV/AIDS poses a serious public health threat in the United States. Of particular concern has been the detrimental impact that this crisis has wrought on urban centers, where people of color, particularly racial and ethnic minority youth, are disproportionately impacted by this twin epidemic. The U.S. federal government has made a concerted effort to fund demonstration projects through its Minority AIDS Initiative (MAI) in geographic areas with high rates of substance abuse and HIV/AIDS prevalence, with the specific intent of introducing culturally-resonant, model prevention protocols with proven effectiveness. Responding to this public health emergency, the U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), Center for Substance Abuse Prevention (CSAP), introduced the Strategic Prevention Framework (SPF) to guide prevention planning and implementation efforts throughout the U.S. This paper illustrates the five steps of the SPF (e.g., assessment, capacity, planning, implementation, and evaluation) by describing its application to Project C.O.P.E. (Communities Organizing for Prevention and Empowerment), which is a comprehensive substance abuse and HIV/AIDS prevention program located in the northeastern United States.

Keywords: Substance Abuse and HIV/AIDS, Culturally-Tailored Model Prevention Protocols, Racial and Ethnic Urban Minority Youth, Strategic Prevention Framework (SPF)

The International Journal of Interdisciplinary Social and Community Studies, Volume 7, Issue 4, pp.13-28. Article: Print (Spiral Bound). Article: Electronic (PDF File; 531.522KB).

Dr. Robert J. Reid

Associate Professor, Department of Family and Child Studies, College of Education and Human Services, Montclair State University, Montclair, NJ, USA

Robert J. Reid, PhD, is an Associate Professor in the Department of Family and Child Studies, College of Education and Human Services, at Montclair State University. His research has focused on the development, coordination, and testing of community-wide prevention initiatives to reduce risk factors and to promote protective factors associated with various health behaviors, such as adolescent substance abuse, sexual risk, and youth violence. Dr. Reid’s research has continually examined the factors that may either enhance or constrain the quality of life for children, families, and communities. Since 2003, he has served as Principal Investigator on a Minority AIDS Initiative (MAI) grant, which is funded by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), Center for Substance Abuse Prevention (CSAP). Through this decade-long initiative, Dr. Reid has developed and coordinated comprehensive substance abuse and HIV/AIDS prevention services targeting underserved racial and ethnic minority youth in the city of Paterson, New Jersey. More recently, Dr. Reid has been funded by the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy and SAMHSA to continue his prevention work in the Paterson community by developing the infrastructure of an anti-drug coalition targeting at-risk urban minority adolescents.

Dr. Pauline Garcia-Reid

Associate Professor, Department of Family and Child Studies, College of Education and Human Services, Montclair State University, Montclair, New Jersey, USA

Pauline Garcia-Reid, PhD, is an Associate Professor in the Department of Family and Child Studies, College of Education and Human Services, with an affiliate appointment in the Center for Child Advocacy and Policy, College Humanities and Social Sciences, at Montclair State University. Her research interests include youth substance use and violence prevention, social justice and advocacy within a culturally-grounded social work lens, and practice and research with racial and ethnic minority children and families. She has also served as a technical advisor to the SAMHSA National Registry of Effective Prevention Programs Project (NREPP).