Premature Francophone Infants in Northern Ontario as the Object of Interdisciplinary Research

By Roxanne Bélanger, Nicole Keating, Chantal Mayer-Crittenden, Michèle Minor-Corriveau and Manon Robillard.

Published by The International Journal of Interdisciplinary Social and Community Studies

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Premature birth has an impact on many Canadian women. Since prematurity is not restricted to a particular group, it is not easily identifiable. However, it is imperative to understand the factors associated with premature births because they are the leading cause of infant mortality in developed countries, and represent approximately three of every four deaths occurring during the perinatal period. Premature birth is also accompanied by multiple and interrelated risk factors requiring health care providers from a variety of disciplines. The review of the literature reveals that there exists little agreement on the effects of prematurity, especially extreme prematurity, on child development. However, researchers agree that all domains of development remain vulnerable following a premature birth. This paper will provide an overview of prematurity and its consequences, notably those associated with neurodevelopmental outcomes. The challenges regarding research in prematurity will be discussed as well as the need for interdisciplinary research in this complex field.

Keywords: Speech and Language Pathology, Prematurity, Interdisciplinarity

The International Journal of Interdisciplinary Social and Community Studies, Volume 7, Issue 3, pp.103-115. Article: Print (Spiral Bound). Article: Electronic (PDF File; 423.520KB).

Dr. Roxanne Bélanger

Associate Professor, Department of French Studies, Bachelor's Program in Health Sciences - Baccalauréat ès sciences de la santé (orthophonie), Laurentian University - Université Laurentienne, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada

Roxanne Bélanger is an assistant professor in the B.H.Sc. and M.H.Sc. in Speech-language Pathology at Laurentian University, Ontario, Canada. She is a practicing speech-language pathologist with clinical experience in neonatology, pediatric and geriatric settings. She graduated as an SLP in 2002 at Ottawa University and is currently pursuing her doctoral studies at Laurentian University, studying neurodevelopmental outcomes of children born prematurely. She has gained various speaking experiences on prematurity, including national and international conferences.

Nicole Keating

Speech and Language Pathologist, PhD student, Laurentian University, Sudbury

Nicole Keating is a speech-language pathologist for the Sudbury Catholic District School Board. She is presently pursuing doctoral studies in the interdisciplinary Human Studies program at Laurentian University in Ontario, Canada, where she is also a sessional professor for the Speech-language Pathology program.

Dr. Chantal Mayer-Crittenden

Assistant Professor, Speech and Language Pathology Programs, Department of French Studies, Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada

Chantal Mayer-Crittenden is a speech-language pathologist and assistant professor in the Speech-language Pathology program at Laurentian University, Ontario, Canada. She has a special interest in primary language impairment (PLI), interdisciplinary research and bilingualism. Her doctoral thesis examined the linguistic and cognitive abilities of bilingual children with a PLI. She has presented at the international level on this topic.

Dr. Michèle Minor-Corriveau

Assistant Professor, Speech and Language Pathology Programs, Department of French Studies, Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada

Michèle Minor-Corriveau is currently an assistant professor in the Speech-language Pathology program at Laurentian University in Ontario, Canada. She is also a speech-language pathologist with 15 years of clinical experience working with school-aged children. Michèle obtained her PhD in the interdisciplinary doctorate of Human Studies at Laurentian University. She has gained various lecturing experiences speaking about test standardization and validation as it pertains to linguistic minority settings both locally and internationally.

Dr. Manon Robillard

Assistant Professor, Speech and Language Pathology Programs, Department of French Studies, Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada

Manon Robillard is currently an assistant professor for the Speech-language Pathology program at Laurentian University in Ontario, Canada. She is also a speech-language pathologist with 14 years of clinical experience in augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). Manon completed her doctoral studies in the interdisciplinary Human Studies program at Laurentian University. She has gained various speaking experiences in AAC, including international conferences.